basket making home graphic




WHAT THE BASKET MEANS TO THE INDIAN : Page 180


APACHE GRAIN PLAQUES AND JARS (Arizona)

Figure 8. APACHE GRAIN PLAQUES AND JARS (Arizona)

All made from the sisal willow strippings and the black seed vessels of a desert plant {Martynia) popularly known as

the " Cat Claws "

(Courtesy of The American Museum of Natural History, New York)

grasses, colored with natural dyes, and stems of the maiden hair fern, the whole often representing weeks of work.

Ages before people had pottery to cook in they had basketry, which is, indeed, the oldest and the most universally practised handicraft known. Perhaps a hunter returned home hungry one day in the far away past, and his wife, anxious to hasten dinner for her impatient lord, coated her cooking basket with clay that she might set it directly over the fir£ without danger of burning. Imagine the woman's surprise and joy to find on removing it from the embers after dinner that she had a basket plus an earthenware pot! Thus directly from basketry was pottery evolved. One finds the same shaped vessels of clay as of wicker work among the Zuni and other potters, and the same decorations in many instances on both. Moreover the Hava-supai still use clay-lined basket-plaques to hold glowing wood embers and kernels of corn, which are kept dancing together by the dexterous cook until the corn is parched; meanwhile the clay hardens. Numbers of good cooking utensils are thus produced.

Basket Making Home | Basketry Site Map | Other Basketry Resources
2005 basket-making.com Your source for basketry and basket making resources
 
Basket Making Home
Basket Making   Sections:
 

basket making course